Someone left us a pinwheel!

Someone left us a pinwheel!

Did you know that Lawrence University was founded as the Lawrence Institute in 1847, the name was changed to Lawrence University by the first day of classes in 1849, changed to Lawrence College in 1913, then changed back to Lawrence University in 1964 during the consolidation with Milwaukee-Downer College?
The year 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the Milwaukee-Downer College and Lawrence College consolidation. In celebration of this anniversary, our Archivist, Erin Dix ‘08, will present, “Strength through Union:” Exploring the Consolidation, on Wednesday, July 23rd at 10 a.m. This presentation will take place on the first floor of the Mudd Library and all are welcome! Coffee and snacks will be provided.

Did you know that Lawrence University was founded as the Lawrence Institute in 1847, the name was changed to Lawrence University by the first day of classes in 1849, changed to Lawrence College in 1913, then changed back to Lawrence University in 1964 during the consolidation with Milwaukee-Downer College?

The year 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the Milwaukee-Downer College and Lawrence College consolidation. In celebration of this anniversary, our Archivist, Erin Dix ‘08, will present, “Strength through Union:” Exploring the Consolidation, on Wednesday, July 23rd at 10 a.m. This presentation will take place on the first floor of the Mudd Library and all are welcome! Coffee and snacks will be provided.

We recently processed the pamphlet, An Oration Delivered on the Battlefield of Gettysburg, (November 19, 1863) at the Consecration of the Cemetery. This item was donated to the Mudd Library’s Lincoln Collection by Robert S. French ‘48, donor of much of that collection. 

While versions of the Gettysburg Address were immediately published in newspapers, this rare printing of Lincoln’s address is virtually its first publication in book form. Notice in the bottom photo that President Lincoln’s famous address only spans one paragraph- and took only minutes to deliver. Mr. Everett’s preceding oration takes up many pages in this pamphlet- and had lasted over two hours.

At this weekend’s reunion festivities, Lawrence will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the consolidation between Lawrence and Milwaukee-Downer College. In spirit of this celebration, the library is displaying a collection of art by Milwaukee-Downer alumna, Judith King Peterson, M-D ‘63. Thanks to our friends at the Wriston Galleries for selecting and displaying these handsome pieces!

Currently on display in the library display cases is a beautiful collection of ornate textiles and other handcrafted objects made by the Rabari people of India. This eye-catching display was curated by Beth Zinsli and Leslie Walfish of the Wriston Galleries.

The objects are a selection from the larger Judy Frater, ’74 Collection of Indian Rabari Objects. The collection was assembled by Lawrence alumna Judy Frater during her travels in India, and later curated by her into a traveling exhibit. This exhibit was donated to Lawrence by Ms. Frater and displayed in the Wriston Galleries in 1987.

The Rabaris are an ancient nomadic people who slowly migrated from Central Asia to the Indian subcontinent around twelve centuries ago… One of these groups, the Kachi Rabaris, lives in the desert Kutch. Kachis are herders of goats and sheep and are semi-nomadic. In their leisure time the women make mirrored embroideries for their childrens’ dress and their daughters’ dowries. Embroidery is a part of their way of life.

In recognition of her contributions to the preservation of crafting traditions, Ms. Frater will be receiving the George B. Walter ’36 Service to Society Award during this weekend’s Reunion Convocation.

The collection will remain on display in the library through June 30th.

Time for summer adventures!

Time for summer adventures!

popuparchive:

Our public archive is rife with historic audio from the movement for equality and freedom of speech that swept the UC Berkeley campus in the mid 1960s. Check out some of the highlights from the UC-Berkeley Ethnic Studies Library collection:

An audio history of the Free Speech Movement

#HackFSM: Using Pop Up Archive to search speech audio in the new Free Speech Movement Digital Archive for UC-Berkeley

In April, a group at UC-Berkeley made use of the historic content in our collections during a hackathon hosted for students to design the new Free Speech Movement Digital Archive.

The winning site, prototyped in just twelve days, uses Pop Up Archive’s public API to make Free Speech audio searchable directly from the site alongside images, text, and a timeline. By making audio from the UCSF Archives & Special Collections and UC-Berkeley Ethnic Studies Library in Pop Up Archive searchable, forgotten voices of history can be just a keyword search away.

(Note: though audio search is enabled, due to server errors unrelated to Pop Up Archive, audio does not currently play from the hackathon’s winning site.)

Play with our super simple API and imagine how you can incorporate our tools for audio search into your site.

 

todaysdocument:


"JUDGEMENT LOVING against VIRGINIA REVERSED today. Opinion mailed.
Advise associates.”
Telegram to Bernard Cohen Announcing the Verdict of Loving v. Virginia, 06/12/1967
From the Records of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1772 - 2007

On June 12, 1967, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple whose marriage had been prohibited by the state of Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act.  This telegram was sent from John F. Davis, clerk of the court, to the Loving’s attorney, Bernard S. Cohen.
(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

todaysdocument:

"JUDGEMENT LOVING against VIRGINIA REVERSED today. Opinion mailed.

Advise associates.”

Telegram to Bernard Cohen Announcing the Verdict of Loving v. Virginia, 06/12/1967

From the Records of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1772 - 2007

On June 12, 1967, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple whose marriage had been prohibited by the state of Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act.  This telegram was sent from John F. Davis, clerk of the court, to the Loving’s attorney, Bernard S. Cohen.

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

We received an ask earlier today from bookofrevelation asking about the oldest book we have here at the Mudd, and here’s a post with more information on the Nuremberg Chronicle (officially titled Liber Chronicarum)!

Issued just seven months after Columbus landed in North America, the Nuremberg Chronicle was printed in 1493 in Nuremberg, Germany, by Anton Koberger (1440?-1513) who was the most renowned German printmaker of his time.  The publication of the Nuremberg Chronicle and Koberger’s other work, the Schatzbehalteris considered only second in importance to the printing of Gutenberg’s bible. 

Both volumes were illustrated by the engraver Michael Wolgemut, who was Albrecht Dürer’s instructor in painting and engraving.  The Nuremberg Chronicle is regarded by many scholars as the first major picture book for the middle class. 

The Chronicle contains 1809 illustrations, with a total of 645 different woodcuts.  Some scholars believe that the Chronicle’s woodcuts mark a revolution in the print medium from the territorial to the pictorial/landscape view.  

While the original copy of the Nuremberg Chronicle is not available to be circulated, we do have a reproduction that is cataloged as Liber Chronicarum.  

More pictures of the book can be found here as well!

Sometimes library items have to be replaced because they’ve disappeared. Sometimes they’ve been defaced. But sometimes they were just loved to death.
You might say the library has some great music and crummy music. We try to be inclusive. Pages do crumble and usually we pick up the crumbs and stick them back together. But sooner or later the time comes to say goodbye to old friends. Farewell, good and faithful servant. Welcome shiny new score. May you live a long and useful life like your predecessor.

Sometimes library items have to be replaced because they’ve disappeared. Sometimes they’ve been defaced. But sometimes they were just loved to death.

You might say the library has some great music and crummy music. We try to be inclusive. Pages do crumble and usually we pick up the crumbs and stick them back together. But sooner or later the time comes to say goodbye to old friends. Farewell, good and faithful servant. Welcome shiny new score. May you live a long and useful life like your predecessor.